April, 2020

202030Apr12:00 PM1:00 PMBet Your Bottom Dollar: Mapping and Modelling Benthic Macrofauna Distribution in the New York Wind Energy Area12:00 PM - 1:00 PM Organizer: National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration Region:OnlineTopic:Data,EducationalCost:No CostConfidence:High TagsFree,online,Weekday

Details

Title:
Bet Your Bottom Dollar: Mapping and Modelling Benthic Macrofauna Distribution in the New York Wind Energy Area

Presenter(s):
Will Sautter, Marine GIS Analyst working for CSS, Inc, in support of NOAA’s National Centers for Coastal Ocean Science, Marine Spatial Ecology Division, Biogeography Branch. Presenting in person at NOAA in Silver Spring.

Sponsor(s):
NOAA’s National Ocean Service (NOS); coordinator is Tracy Gill. If interested in obtaining a PDF of the slides and/or the mp4 recording, contact Tracy Gill.

Remote Access:
Please register here. After registering, you will get a confirmation email with a link to the webinar. If you have not used Adobe connect before, it is best to test your ability to use Adobe Connect, before the webinar, here. Audio is over the computer, so adjust the volume on your computer speakers or headset. Users should use either google, IE or Edge on Windows or Safari if using a Mac. Questions will be addressed in the chat window. If interested in obtaining a PDF of the slides and/or the mp4 recording, contact Tracy Gill.

Abstract:

NOAA’s National Centers for Coastal Ocean Science (NCCOS) was funded by the Bureau of Ocean Energy Management (BOEM) to conduct a substrate analysis and benthic faunal assessment of the New York Wind Energy Area (NYWEA). NCCOS mapped the NYWEA using multibeam echosounders for bathymetry and backscatter, and then conducted a ground validation mission using a modified van Veen grab sampler. Underwater video data and sediment samples were collected at 400 different ground validation sites to classify the geoform, substrate, and biotic cover of the seafloor. The ground validation analysis revealed a vast sandy seascape with aggregations of pebbles and broken shell, and large colonies of foraging common sand dollars (Echinarachnius parma). Other benthic macrofauna were observed in the NYWEA including common sea stars (Asterias rubens), polychaete worms, hermit crabs ( Paguroidea sp.), and Atlantic moon snails (Euspira heros). The only species of fish that was observed during the survey was the little skate (Leucoraja erinacea), however the common sand dollar was the most abundant and widely distributed type of fauna. We used multiple linear regressions and geospatial models to examine the relationships between sand dollar abundance across depth, substrate type, and geoform type. This information helps scientists and managers understand how benthic faunal communities are distributed in the New York Bight, which is a critical component for the site suitability analysis and environmental impact assessments for the offshore wind farm.

Bio(s):
Will Sautter is a marine GIS analyst with the National Centers for Coastal Ocean Science in Silver Spring, MD. Originally from Charleston, SC, he received a Bachelor of Science in Geology at Appalachian State University in North Carolina and is currently working on a Master’s in Environmental Science and Policy from Johns Hopkins University. He specializes in mapping the seafloor using multibeam sonars, video analysis, and sedimentology. Will has been a part of many mapping missions through the National Ocean Service; from finding shipwrecks in National Marine Sanctuaries, exploring uncharted canyons in the Caribbean, to helping inform management decisions for offshore renewable energy projects. His latest work has been focussed on the habitat mapping of the New York Wind Energy Area, which was funded by the Bureau of Ocean Energy Management (BOEM).

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Time

Thursday, April 30 - 12:00pm 2020 - Thursday, April 30 - 1:00pm 2020

Organizer

National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration

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